Work

AppleIIgs

I make web sites happen. I code. I create user experiences.

It started in elementary school, thanks to my brother saving his paper route money to buy an Apple II+, and later an Apple IIgs (Woz signature Limited Edition). I've been enthusiastic about programming ever since, but it was when hacking a fairly involved Phone List program -- my masterpiece at the time -- that I realized programming was more of a means to an end for me, the end being the user's experience.

I had a vision. I desperately wanted the screen to look like a phone book, with the columns, alignments, binding, etc. A bunch of lines of code and ASCII art created the closest approximation possible for me at the time, something like this:

!----------------------!
!          !!          !
!          !!          !
!          !!          !
!          !!          !
!          !!          !
!          !!          !
!----------------------!

After this triumph and dabbling in BBSs and such along the way, I discovered being a teenager (i.e. girls), pretty much taking a hiatus from computers until my early twenties. I'm glad I did. It gave me a fresh perspective in many ways when I "rediscovered" software development at about the time the Internet was blossoming.

This was good timing.

I was surprised at how much my early exposure to the fundamentals of programming still applied, making web development feel completely natural for me. (It's all still pretty much maintaing data somewhere and presenting that data in one fashion or another.) But, with the web, we finally had the tools to build interfaces that much more closely resembled what I had envisioned on those early Apple II's.

Today, we can build almost limitless interactive experiences. We fortunate web developers get to be the ones to fully realize and materialize the user experiences dreamed up with talented people from all sorts of disciplines -- artists, designers, wordsmiths, video professionals, computer scientists, business leaders, and on and on.